The Clinician’s Guide to ADHD: Myths & Facts About ADHD Medications

By Diane McIntosh, MD, FRCPC on April 13, 2015
Rate
 

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a treatable condition. Clinical trial evidence and clinical practice guidelines strongly support the use of long-acting stimulant medications as efficacious and safe options for ADHD treatment.1 Despite what is known about these medications—from clinical research and more than 70 years of clinical use—there continue to be common misconceptions held by patients and healthcare professionals alike. The following brief review discusses and dispels some of the more commonly encountered myths.

Myth: All stimulant medications work the same.

Facts: Clinical trial evidence confirms that the efficacy of stimulant medications for ADHD is similar among agents, with only modest differences in measures of efficacy reported by some authors.2-4 However, this does not mean that all stimulant medications work for all patients. In psychiatry, there is clearly an inter-individual variability in response to treatment interventions. It is never “one size fits all” for any psychiatric medication, as we see commonly when prescribing antidepressants, and the same is true for stimulant medications. Some patients will respond to or tolerate one stimulant type or formulation, but not another: the phenomenon of “preferential response.”5 In recognition of this phenomenon, the Canadian ADHD guidelines state, “If there is an unsatisfactory response to one psychostimulant class, then there should be a switch the other psychostimulant class.”1

There are meaningful differences between stimulants with respect to formulations and delivery systems, which can impact the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the individual agents.6 This is of importance not only in terms of dosing requirements (once-daily or multiple daily doses), the onset and termination of effects, and treatment tolerability, but also with respect to the potential for misuse and diversion.7 Short-acting stimulants are more likely to be misused or diverted due to the greater ease of attaining stimulant euphoria with these formulations.1,7

Myth: Stimulant medications are controlled substances, meaning they are associated with potential for dependence.

Facts: When used as prescribed, ADHD medications are not addictive nor are they dependence-forming.8,9 Indeed, one major challenge in ADHD treatment is medication compliance. Patients often fail to take their medication regularly, quite the opposite of compulsive drug-seeking and misuse, despite harmful consequences, seen with drugs of addiction.1,10 As well, tolerance and tachyphylaxis (a decrease in the response to a drug after its administration) are uncommon with ADHD medications. Except for adjustments necessitated by growth among children, once the appropriate dose of a stimulant is found, based on efficacy and tolerability, changes are rarely required.It must be acknowledged that stimulant medications can be misused by patients or diverted to others and abused recreationally.1,8 Although the risk of misuse of ADHD medications is substantially lower than with other controlled substances (e.g., opioids),11 clinical practice guidelines recognize the societal challenges this represents and stress the importance of healthcare professionals a) educating patients about the risks of drug misuse and diversion of medication to friends, and b) being vigilant for the signs of diversion and misuse.1

Myth: Amphetamines are more potent and therefore more dangerous than methylphenidate.

Facts: When used as prescribed, both types of medications are safe. The long-acting formulations of both classes are recommended by the CADDRA guidelines as first-line treatments.1,9

Myth: It is best to start with a short-acting stimulant, to decrease the potential for adverse effects.

Facts: This misperception may stem from a belief that, in the case of a treatment-emergent adverse reaction, it is better to have used a drug remaining in the body for a shorter amount of time. However, current recommendations state that treatment should be initiated with a long-acting agent whenever possible.1 Starting a long-acting stimulant at a low dose and slowly increasing the dose over time, based on efficacy and tolerability, is the most appropriate treatment approach.

Myth: There are no long-term safety data for stimulant therapy.

Facts: While there are methodologic difficulties with trying to prospectively study these medications over the long term,12 in prospective studies over one year, extensive research has not found an increase in side effects or other safety issues over time.13 As well, there is a long track record of stimulant medication use in clinical practice (more than 70 years), providing real-world experience with patient safety.  

Myth: There are significant cardiac risks with all ADHD medications.

Facts: Cardiac events and symptoms are rare among children and adolescents with ADHD, and are not associated with stimulants when these are used as directed.14 A 2011 U.S. FDA study of children and young adults treated with ADHD medication15 did not show an association between stimulant use and adverse cardiovascular (CV) events, including stroke, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The study included more than 1,200,438 children and young adults (aged 2-24 years) and represented 2,579,104 person-years of follow-up (the total sum of the years that each person in the study has been under observation), including 373,667 person-years of current use of ADHD drugs, and found only seven serious CV events in current users of all ADHD treatments. No evidence of increased risk of serious CV effects was found among children and young people who use ADHD medications.

Evidence from adult populations also suggests that there is no increase in risk of major cardiovascular (CV) events among patients aged 25 to 64 years with ADHD using stimulants compared to non-users.16 However, modest increases in heart rate and blood pressure are common with stimulant medications, and the respective product monographs include contraindications, warnings and precautions regarding individuals with pre-existing CV conditions. A joint statement of the Canadian Pediatric Society, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, published in 2009, recommends “a thorough history and physical examination before starting stimulant medications, with an emphasis on the identification of risk factors for sudden death, but does not routinely recommend electrocardiographic screening or cardiac subspecialist consultation unless indicated by history or physical examination findings.”17

Myth: In patients with bipolar disorder, stimulant use leads to switch to manic state.

Facts: This myth is based in fact, but may be exaggerated. Evidence shows there is only a small risk of psychosis/mania among patients treated with stimulant medications.18 This is in contrast to the risk of manic switches among patients with bipolar disorder treated with antidepressants, where the incidence may be as high as 25% of patients treated with an antidepressant used in monotherapy.19
There are no prospective clinical trial data for stimulant medications in the treatment of ADHD with concomitant bipolar disorder, but current clinical practice guidelines recommend that when these two disorders co-exist, the bipolar disorder symptoms should be managed first and once stable, if symptoms of ADHD persist, these should be cautiously treated with stimulant medication.20

 
Development of this article was sponsored through an educational grant from Shire Canada Inc. The author had complete editorial independence in the development of this article and is responsible for its accuracy. The sponsor exerted no influence in the selection of the content or material published.

References:
1. Canadian Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Resource Alliance (CADDRA): Canadian ADHD Practice Guidelines, Third Edition (Version: March 2014), Toronto ON; CADDRA, 2014.
2. Faraone SV, Glatt SJ. A comparison of the efficacy of medications for adult attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder using meta-analysis of effect sizes. J Clin Psychiatry 2010; 71(6):754-63.
3. Faraone SV, Buitelaar J. Comparing the efficacy of stimulants for ADHD in children and adolescents using meta-analysis. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2010; 19(4):353-64.
4. Hosenbocus S, Chahal R. A review of long-acting medications for ADHD in Canada. J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2009; 18(4):331-9.
5. Arnold LE. Methylphenidate vs. amphetamine: comparative review. J Atten Disord 2000; 3:200-11.
6. Ermer JC, Adeyi BA, Pucci ML. Pharmacokinetic variability of long-acting stimulants in the treatment of children and adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. CNS Drugs 2010; 24(12):1009-25.
7. Faraone SV, Upadhyaya HP. The effect of stimulant treatment for ADHD on later substance abuse and the potential for medication misuse, abuse, and diversion. J Clin Psychiatry 2007; 68(11):e28.
8. Clemow DB, Walker DJ. The potential for misuse and abuse of medications in ADHD: a review. Postgrad Med 2014; 126(5):64-81.
9. Merkel RL Jr, Kuchibhatla A. Safety of stimulant treatment in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Part I. Expert Opin Drug Saf 2009; 8(6):655-68.
10. Adler LD, Nierenberg AA. Review of medication adherence in children and adults with ADHD. Postgrad Med 2010; 122(1):184-91.
11. Cassidy TA, et al. Nonmedical use of prescription ADHD stimulant medications among adults in a substance abuse treatment population: early findings from the NAVIPPRO surveillance  system. J Atten Disord 2013; [epub ahead of print].
12. Hazell P. The challenges to demonstrating long-term effects of psychostimulant treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Curr Opin Psychiatry 2011; 24(4):286-90.
13. Lerner M, Wigal T. Long-term safety of stimulant medications used to treat children with ADHD. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2008; 46(8):38-48.
14. Olfson M, Huang C, Gerhard T, et al. Stimulants and cardiovascular events in youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2012; 51(2):147-56.
15. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Safety review update of medications used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and young adults. Available at: www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/ucm277770.htm. Accessed February 2015.
16. Habel LA, Cooper WO, Sox CM, et al. ADHD medications and risk of serious cardiovascular events in young and middle-aged adults. JAMA 2011; 306(24):2673-83.
17. Bélanger SA, Warren AE, Hamilton RM, et al. A joint position statement with the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Paediatr Child Health 2009; 14(9):579-85.
18. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Psychiatric adverse events in clinical trials of drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Memorandum ID# D060163.
19. Valentí M, Pacchiarotti I, Bonnín CM, et al. Risk factors for antidepressant-related switch to mania. J Clin Psychiatry 2012; 73(2):e271-6.
20. Bond DJ; Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Task Force. The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Ann Clin Psychiatry 2012; 24(1):23-37.


Les mythes et les faits entourant les médicaments pour le TDAH

 

par Diane McIntosh, M.D., FRCPC

La Dre McIntosh est professeure adjointe de clinique à la Faculté de médecine du Département de psychiatrie de l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique.

Le trouble déficitaire de l’attention / hyperactivité (TDAH) est une maladie que l’on peut traiter. Les preuves tirées d’essais cliniques et les lignes directrices de pratique clinique appuient sans équivoque l’utilisation des psychostimulants à longue action à titre d’option efficace et sécuritaire pour le traitement du TDAH1. Malgré ce que la recherche clinique et plus de 70 ans d’utilisation clinique nous ont appris à propos de ces médicaments, les patients et les professionnels de la santé continuent d’entretenir des idées fausses à leur sujet. Dans cette brève synthèse, nous aborderons certains des mythes les plus répandus et tenterons de les dissiper.

 

Le mythe : Tous les psychostimulants agissent de la même façon.

LES FAITS : Les preuves tirées d’essais cliniques confirment que les psychostimulants pour le TDAH ont à peu près tous la même efficacité, certains auteurs ne signalant que des différences modestes au plan des paramètres d’efficacité2-4. Cela ne signifie toutefois pas que les psychostimulants sont tous interchangeables. En psychiatrie, il y a de toute évidence une variabilité interindividuelle de la réponse aux interventions thérapeutiques. Il n’y a jamais de « solution universelle » en ce qui concerne les médicaments pour les problèmes de santé mentale, comme on le voit souvent dans le cas des antidépresseurs, et il en va de même pour les psychostimulants. La réponse ou la tolérance des patients peuvent varier selon le type ou la préparation de stimulant. C’est le phénomène de « réponse préférentielle »5. Reconnaissant ce phénomène, les lignes directrices canadiennes sur le TDAH préconisent le passage à une autre classe de psychostimulants si la réponse à une classe de psychostimulants est insatisfaisante1.

On constate des différences importantes entre les psychostimulants en ce qui a trait aux préparations et aux systèmes d’administration et cela peut avoir un impact sur leur pharmacocinétique et leur pharmacodynamie respectives6. Or, cela revêt une importance non seulement en ce qui concerne la posologie (administration uni- ou pluriquotidienne), le début d’action et la durée des effets et la tolérabilité du traitement, mais aussi en ce qui concerne les risques de mésusage et de détournement7. Les psychostimulants à courte action sont plus susceptibles d’être utilisés à mauvais escient ou détournés parce que ces préparations procurent plus facilement une sensation d’euphorie1,7.

 

Le mythe : Les psychostimulants sont des substances contrôlées, ce qui signifie qu’ils sont associés à un risque de dépendance.

LES FAITS : Lorsqu’on les utilise comme prescrits, les médicaments pour le TDAH ne sont pas addictifs et ne provoquent pas la dépendance8,9. En fait, le principal défi associé au traitement du TDAH concerne plutôt l’observance thérapeutique. Souvent, les patients négligent de prendre leur médicament régulièrement, ce qui est le contraire d’un mésusage ou d’un désir compulsif de consommer, observés avec les médicaments addictifs, malgré de graves conséquences1,10. De même, la tolérance et la tachyphylaxie (diminution de la réponse à un médicament après son administration) sont rares avec les médicaments pour le TDAH. À l’exception des ajustements requis chez les enfants en croissance, une fois la dose appropriée de psychostimulants établie selon l’efficacité et la tolérabilité, elle a rarement besoin d’être modifiée.

Il faut reconnaître que les psychostimulants peuvent être utilisés à mauvais escient par les patients ou détournés ou consommés à des fins récréatives1,8. Même si le risque de mésusage des médicaments pour le TDAH est substantiellement moindre qu’avec d’autres substances contrôlées (p. ex. les opioïdes)11, les lignes directrices de pratique clinique reconnaissent les défis sociétaux en jeu et soulignent qu’il est important que les professionnels de la santé a) éduquent leurs patients au sujet des risques associés au mésusage du médicament et à son partage avec autrui et b) surveillent les signes de détournement et de mésusage1.

 

Le mythe : Les amphétamines sont plus puissantes et par conséquent, plus dangereuses que le méthylphénidate.

LES FAITS : Utilisés comme prescrits, les deux types de médicaments sont sécuritaires. Les préparations à longue action des deux classes d’agents sont recommandées dans les lignes directrices de la CADDRA en traitement de première intention1,9.

 

Le mythe : Il est préférable de commencer par un stimulant à courte action pour réduire le risque de réactions indésirables.

LES FAITS : Cette idée fausse vient probablement de la croyance selon laquelle en cas de réaction indésirable à un médicament, il est préférable d’avoir utilisé un agent qui persiste moins longtemps dans l’organisme. Toutefois, les recommandations actuelles préconisent l’utilisation d’un agent à longue action dès le départ dans la mesure du possible1. L’approche thérapeutique la plus appropriée consiste à commencer avec un psychostimulant à longue action à une dose faible, que l’on augmente graduellement selon l’efficacité et la tolérabilité.

 

Le mythe : On ne dispose pas de données sur l’innocuité à long terme des agents psychostimulants.

LES FAITS : Même si, pour des raisons méthodologiques, il est difficile d’étudier ces médicaments de manière prospective à long terme12, lors d’études prospectives échelonnées sur une année, des recherches approfondies n’ont observé aucun accroissement des effets secondaires ou autres problèmes d’innocuité avec le temps13. L’utilisation des psychostimulants dans la pratique clinique repose également sur une longue feuille de route (plus de 70 ans d’utilisation), ce qui témoigne concrètement de l’expérience des patients au plan de l’innocuité.

 

Le mythe : Tous les médicaments pour le TDAH comportent un risque cardiaque important.

LES FAITS : Les événements et symptômes cardiaques sont rares chez les enfants et adolescents atteints de TDAH et ne sont pas associés aux psychostimulants lorsque ces derniers sont utilisés conformément aux directives14. Une étude de la FDA des États-Unis menée en 2011 auprès d’enfants et de jeunes adultes traités au moyen de médicaments pour le TDAH15 n’a observé aucun lien entre l’utilisation des psychostimulants et les événements cardiovasculaires (CV), y compris AVC, infarctus du myocarde et mort subite d’origine cardiaque. L’étude a regroupé plus de 1 200 438 enfants et jeunes adultes (âgés de 2 à 24 ans) et a représenté 2 579 104 personnes-années de suivi (somme des années durant lesquelles l’ensemble des sujets de l’étude ont été observés), dont 373 667 personnes-années sous traitement actif pour le TDAH et n’a relevé que sept événements CV graves chez les sujets qui se trouvaient sous un quelconque traitement pour le TDAH. On n’a observé aucun accroissement du risque d’effets CV graves chez les enfants et les jeunes patients traités au moyen de médicaments pour le TDAH.

Les preuves provenant de populations adultes ne font pas non plus mention d’un accroissement du risque d’événements CV majeurs chez les patients de 25 à 64 ans atteints de TDAH et traités par psychostimulants comparativement aux non-utilisateurs16. Toutefois, de modestes augmentations de la fréquence cardiaque et de la tension artérielle sont courantes avec les médicaments psychostimulants et les monographies respectives de ces produits incluent des contre-indications, des mises en garde et des précautions concernant les patients qui présenteraient déjà des maladies CV. La Société canadienne de pédiatrie, la Société canadienne de cardiologie et l’Académie canadienne de psychiatrie de l’enfant et de l’adolescent ont préparé un énoncé de position conjoint, publié en 2009, qui prône une anamnèse et un examen physique détaillés avant la prescription de psychostimulants mettant l’accent sur le dépistage des facteurs de risque de mort subite, mais qui ne contient pas de recommandations systématiques de dépistage électrocardiographique ou de consultation avec un spécialiste en cardiologie, à moins que les antécédents ou que l’examen physique ne le justifient17.

 

Le mythe : Chez les patients atteints de trouble bipolaire, l’utilisation d’un psychostimulant peut déclencher une phase de manie.

LES FAITS : Ce mythe se fonde sur des faits, mais il est exagéré. Selon les preuves, il n’y a qu’un léger risque de psychose/manie chez les patients traités par des psychostimulants18. Cela contraste nettement avec le risque d’entrer en phase de manie chez les patients atteints de trouble bipolaire traités par antidépresseurs; dans ce cas, l’incidence peut atteindre jusqu’à 25 % chez les patients traités par antidépresseurs en monothérapie19. On ne dispose pas de données tirées d’essais cliniques prospectifs sur les psychostimulants chez les patients traités pour un TDAH et un trouble bipolaire comorbide, mais, selon les lignes directrices de pratique clinique actuelles, lorsque les deux problèmes coexistent, il faut d’abord traiter les symptômes de trouble bipolaire et, une fois ceux-ci stabilisés, si les symptômes de TDAH persistent, on les traitera avec circonspection au moyen de psychostimulants20.

La préparation de cet article a été rendue possible grâce à une subvention à la formation versée par Shire Canada inc. L’auteure a pu exercer une pleine indépendance éditoriale lors de la rédaction de son article et est responsable de son exactitude. Le commanditaire n’a exercé aucune influence sur le choix du contenu ou du matériel publié.

 

Références :
1. Canadian Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Resource Alliance (CADDRA) : Lignes directrices canadiennes sur le TDAH, Troisième édition (Version : mars 2014), Toronto Ont.; CADDRA, 2014.
2. Faraone SV, Glatt SJ. A comparison of the efficacy of medications for adult attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder using meta-analysis of effect sizes. J Clin Psychiatry 2010; 71(6):754-63.
3. Faraone SV, Buitelaar J. Comparing the efficacy of stimulants for ADHD in children and adolescents using meta-analysis. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2010; 19(4):353-64.
4. Hosenbocus S, Chahal R. A review of long-acting medications for ADHD in Canada. J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2009; 18(4):331-9.
5. Arnold LE. Methylphenidate vs. amphetamine: comparative review. J Atten Disord 2000; 3:200-11.
6. Ermer JC, Adeyi BA, Pucci ML. Pharmacokinetic variability of long-acting stimulants in the treatment of children and adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. CNS Drugs 2010; 24(12):1009-25.

7. Faraone SV, Upadhyaya HP. The effect of stimulant treatment for ADHD on later substance abuse and the potential for medication misuse, abuse, and diversion. J Clin Psychiatry 2007; 68(11):e28.

8. Clemow DB, Walker DJ. The potential for misuse and abuse of medications in ADHD: a review. Postgrad Med 2014; 126(5):64-81.
9. Merkel RL Jr, Kuchibhatla A. Safety of stimulant treatment in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Part I. Expert Opin Drug Saf 2009; 8(6):655-68.
10. Adler LD, Nierenberg AA. Review of medication adherence in children and adults with ADHD. Postgrad Med 2010; 122(1):184-91.
11. Cassidy TA, et coll. Nonmedical use of prescription ADHD stimulant medications among adults in a substance abuse treatment population: early findings from the NAVIPPRO surveillance system. J Atten Disord 2013; [publication électronique avant impression].
12. Hazell P. The challenges to demonstrating long-term effects of psychostimulant treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Curr Opin Psychiatry 2011; 24(4):286-90.
13. Lerner M, Wigal T. Long-term safety of stimulant medications used to treat children with ADHD. J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2008; 46(8):38-48.
14. Olfson M, Huang C, Gerhard T, et coll. Stimulants and cardiovascular events in youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2012; 51(2):147-56.
15. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Safety review update of medications used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and young adults. Disponible à l’adresse : www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/ucm277770.htm. Consulté en février 2015.
16. Habel LA, Cooper WO, Sox CM, et coll. ADHD medications and risk of serious cardiovascular events in young and middle-aged adults. JAMA 2011; 306(24):2673-83.
17. Bélanger SA, Warren AE, Hamilton RM, et coll. A joint position statement with the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Paediatr Child Health 2009; 14(9):579-85.
18. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Psychiatric adverse events in clinical trials of drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Memorandum ID# D060163.
19. Valentí M, Pacchiarotti I, Bonnín CM, et coll. Risk factors for antidepressant-related switch to mania. J Clin Psychiatry 2012; 73(2):e271-6.
20. Bond DJ; Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Task Force. The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Ann Clin Psychiatry 2012; 24(1):23-37.


By Diane McIntosh, MD, FRCPC| April 13, 2015
Categories:  Feature Article
Keywords:  Psychiatry
                                                                                                                                                                       
Copyright © Agility Inc. 2017